Spill Control

It is a legal requirement under the Oil Storage Regulations (OSR) and the Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations (COMAH) to ensure that measures are in place to reduce the risk of accidental pollution. If you store or transport oil, fuel or other hazOil Spillardous materials that could pose a risk to life or the environment you will need to have adequate spill control measures in place.

Spill control kits are readily available a range can be found on Trade Shop Direct these can include kits for small spills up to larger kits and pallets with sumps. You need to ensure that your spill control capacity is enough to handle a complete spillage, just in case a container is full when the spill occurs.

In order to contain the spill you may need additional items such as booms or drain covers to ensure the spill does not enter the environment via the drainage network, containment is the second step in handling a spill, (the first being personal protection, you must use PPE adequate for the spillage you are handling) once contained you can work on step three, removal.

Trade Shop Direct has a wide range of spill control products to ensure that you can stock the correct items needed to control a spill in your specific environment, in addition we can supply training courses on how to handle spills so that you and your staff know exactly what to do should the worst happen. please give us a call for more information 01353 665141.

Bikers Tank Grip Tape

With the improvement in weather and the start for the bank holidays around the corner, if you are a biker you are probably getting your iron horse cleaned up and ready for a blast in the sun!

Have you thought about adding some adhesive grip material to your tank? It is possible to buy sheets/strips of material to stick to the sides or top of your tank (and other areas of your bike) so that you can get a better grip of the bike when cornering etc. Be warned though we have found a number of people buying skate board tape or even anti-slip floor tape as a cheaper alternative. DON’T! This tape is like sand paper and will soon wear through your expensive leathers with no mercy! If you are looking for a cost effective solution without the need for new leathers every month then take a look at www.tradeshopdirect.co.uk.

Used by a number of sidecar racers this tape has a textured surface without being abrasive, it is clear and can easily be cut to length and shapes if needed, it also has waterproof adhesive. The passenger obviously moves around a lot during a race, with this tape in key areas they are assured of grip even in wet conditions. Typically it is used on the sidecar floor, on the top of the bike rear and down the side where the hand holds are so that the inner arm can grip, and with the tape being clear it blends in to the bikes livery.

Sidecar

The tape is sold in lengths from 1m to 18m and is 50mm (2” in old money) wide and available online with next day delivery.

http://www.tradeshopdirect.co.uk/motorbike-tank-gripper-tape

Disposable Gloves – What you need to know!

Disposbale-GlovesIt is amazing how many types of disposable gloves there are on the market, Nitrile, latex, vinyl, powdered, powder free and then there are the colours, which do you choose? With luck this blog will help explain the differences and allow you to make an informed decision on which to buy for the job in hand (punn intended).

 

Material – there are 3 types of material used for disposable gloves, Nitrile, Latex and Vinyl, but what is the difference?

Nitrile, is a synthetic rubber that contains none of the proteins that are present in natural rubber eliminating protein sensitisation that can occur in the wearer causing skin conditions and allergic reactions.

Latex, provides the characteristics of natural rubber in terms of being soft, pliable and strong, with exceptional elasticity, however there is a percentage of the population who are allergic to Latex, so this should be a consideration if buying for a workforce.

Vinyl, as with Nitrile Vinyl gloves do not contain the natural rubber proteins. Vinyl gloves are a cost effective solution if gloves need to be frequently changed.

 

Powder or Powder Free? Most of the time this comes down to personal preference, however there are other factors to be aware of. A powder free glove will be more expensive as they are harder to manufacture compared to powdered gloves. The powdered gloves make it easier to donn the glove and remove them afterwards, it will also help with perspiration. However, the powder free ensure less risk of contamination within a food or chemical environment and also lessen the risk of alergic reactions within the wearer.

 

Acceptance Quality Limit (AQL) – Gloves are tested within the factory using with air or water to check for microscopic holes. The AQL value is generated as a percentage of the chance that they might fail. If 100 gloves are tested and 1.5% have microscopic holes, then the AQL rating is 1.5. An AQL of 4 means there is a 4% chance of microscopic holes, so the smaller the number the higher the quality fo the gloves, if you are in a medical or chemical industry you would look to purchase gloves with the lowest AQL value.

 

Colour – This usually comes down to personal preference, however when it comes to the food or catering industry blue is required as any gloves that make it into the food can easily be visually detected you don’t find may food stuffs that are blue!

 

Still none the wiser in which glove to choose? You find the each industry has pretty much adopted their own colour and material, so other than the option of powdered or not, and the AQL value, this should help.

White Nitrile – Typically used in Dentistry, Hospitals and Pharmaceutical roles.

Black Nitrile – Typically used in the Automotive industry and Tattoo parlours.

Blue Nitrile – Used in most industries but a requirement for Food Processing and Catering.

Pink Nitrile – Typically used by Beauticians.

Latex – General cleaning usage, colour tends not to be important.

Vinyl – General usage as with the Latex, however the blue gloves are used in catering.

 

I hope this quick guide helps you make your choice of disposable glove, for more info and to purchase please visit our online shop, http://www.tradeshopdirect.co.uk/gloves

General UK Lockout/Tagout Procedure

lockout tagout procedure.jpg1

ONLY TRAINED & AUTHORISED PERSONNEL ARE PERMITTED TO LOCK OFF EQUIPMENT.

Prepare for shutdown.

Identify the type of energy used to operate the equipment.

Ensure that any secondary energy sources are also identified.

Identify the amount of energy used to operate the equipment.

Identify the potential hazards of that energy.

Locate the method of controlling that energy (switches, breakers, valves etc.)

Inform all affected employees.

Identify all employees who may be affected by the shutdown of equipment and inform them of the shutdown.

Ensure they know who is locking off the equipment and why.

Turn off the equipment.

Turn off the equipment using the operator controls

Follow the standard procedure for shutdown and ensure no-one is at risk when doing so.

Isolate all energy sources.

Ensure that ALL energy sources have been isolated.

Ensure that any secondary energy sources are isolated.

Ensure that ALL stored energy in the equipment is dissipated, e.g.

relieving trapped pressure.

releasing tension in sprints or block their movement.

block or brace parts that may fall due to gravity.

block parts in hydraulic and pneumatic systems that could move due to loss of pressure

bleeding, venting, flushing pipes with liquids or gases, ensuring appropriate precautions are taken against hazardous contents.

dissipating heat or cold and wear appropriate protective clothing.

Monitor and react to situations where stored energy can re-accumulate.

Lock off switches.

Lock off all switches or other energy controls (e.g. valves, circuit breakers) by using a suitable lock off device.

Only devices specifically designed for locking out should be used.

Each person working on the equipment should have their own personal padlock.

Each personal working on the equipment should place their padlock on the locking off device.

If the isolation device cannot support the number of padlocks needed, use a hasp or other suitable devices as necessary.

Apply purpose designed tags to the lockout to warn employees of the danger of the re-energising the equipment. These tags should be fit for purpose – durable, resistant to environmental conditions and attached securely to the lockout device.

Ensure the details of the tags are completed in full.

Test the equipment controls and circuits.

Make sure that all danger areas are clear from personnel and switch on the equipment.

Press ALL the start buttons or activation controls on the equipment to test the correct circuits have been isolated.

Test all of the circuits using the appropriate testing equipment to ensure that they have all been isolated.

Verify the main disconnect switch or circuit breaker can not be turned on.

Perform maintenance.

When preforming the maintenance of the equipment ensure that your actions will not reactivate the equipment.

If modifying or installing new equipment ensure that your actions will not reactivate the equipment.

If modifying or installing new equipment do not bypass the lockout.

When maintenance is complete ensure the correct reactivation procedure is followed to ensure the safety of both the person(s) working on the equipment and any employees that may be affected.

What is Lockout Tagout?

lockout tagout procedures1Basically Lockout Tagout is a physical method of preventing equipment from being re-energised when it is unsafe to do so.

Every year a large number of workers are injured in industrial accidents resulting from the unexpected start-up of workplace equipment and machinery. By ensuring that Lockout Tagout procedures are followed the risk can be prevented and injuries minimised.

Lockout is a physical method of keeping equipment from being re-energised, stop any unexpected movement, prevent the release of stored energy including the flow of gases and fluids. For example, to isolate an electrical circuit turn the appropriate breaker to the off position and place a lockout device in place to keep in this position. A padlock is then put in place on the lockout device to ensure it can only be removed by the person who locked it off.

Tagout is a highly visible warning placed on the equipment which has been isolated.  The tag should be of sufficient durability for the conditions, attached securely and proved details of the person who applied it. A tagout system should never be used without an appropriate lockout procedure as it does not provide the same measure of protection.

Lockout Tagout procedure should be followed during repair or maintenance of equipment where a worker could be injured by the unexpected start up of machinery. Depending on the type of machinery and energy source depends on which lockout device is used, energy can take many forms, which may include:

Electrical energy – commonly found powering nearly all workplace equipment.

Hydraulic energy – commonly found powering forklifts, cutting equipment and pumps.

Mechanical energy – commonly found in all machinery with moving parts.

Thermal energy – commonly found in equipment such as ovens or freezers (hot & cold).

Pneumatic energy – commonly found powering machinery via compressed air or gas.

Potential – commonly found in compressed springs or suspended weights.

Only trained and authorised employees are allowed to perform repairs, servicing and maintenance on equipment, and therefore training of all affected personnel must be arranged. This includes authorised employees who will be performing maintenance on the equipment as they need to recognise hazardous energy sources and the means necessary for isolation and control.

All other employees, contractors and visitors need to be made aware of the Lockout Tagout procedure with specific emphasis on the prohibition relating to attempts to restart or re-energise equipment which has been locked out.

Tags are an effective way of communicating the status of equipment which is undergoing maintenance.  Appropriate tags should be provided by the employer and be fit for purpose, they need to be:

  • Durable and hardwearing
  • Resistant to moisture, oils and other contaminants.
  • Easy to read and understand
  • Identify the person who installed it
  • Be attached using a method which is secure and that cannot be easily released. They should also be able to be attached by hand and should not be re-used.

Tags should always be used in conjunction with an appropriate lockout device. In some instances where it is not possible to attached a lockout device then tags may be used if there is no other physical alternative of isolation.

Further information can be found in current UK legislation. This has been put in place to prevent such accident occurring by controlling unauthorised or accidental use of energy.  The Provision and Use of Work Equipment 1998, Section 19 Energy and Electrical at Work Regulations 1989, Regulation 13 both specifically cover these aspects.

In addition The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and The Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1999 both state that an employer should ‘make suitable and sufficient assessment of the risks to the health and safety of his employees’ and ensure their ‘health, safety and welfare at work’.

Also the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 also states that it is also the responsibility of the employee to ensure the ‘health and safety of himself and of other persons who may be affected by his acts or omission of work.

Ensure your workplace environment and employees are safe and risks are minimised by following strict Lockout Tagout procedures.  If you need help and guidance please call 01353 665141, our Lockout Tagout specialist will be happy to advise.

Specialist Adhesive Tape Used In Heating Systems

Heating Coil

With the development of advanced adhesive and in particular adhesive tapes many manufacturing processes are moving away from mechanical fixings and adopting new methods of assembly.

As a supplier of specialist adhesive tapes we were approached by a heating and cooling manufacturer to provide a tape that could be used in their manufacturing process. The adhesive tape was to be used in a heat transfer process, bonding an aluminium heating manifold to an alluminium plate where the heat would be radiated into the room. It would need the following properties, faster assembly time compared to traditional mechanical fixings, the ability to conduct temperatures up to 80°C without degrading the adhesive properties and it also had to be a specific non-standard width.

A couple of tapes were selected based on the requirements and a testing process was under taken by the manufacturer. The final tape was then selected based on its performance capability (which exceeded the client’s requirements) and a price point that came in below budget, and it has also increased the speed of manufacture too.

The use of the tape has been a huge success and production has increased to its current rate of 10km of tape a month and it is being considered for other elements of the manufacturing process. The tape has provided an enhanced appearance to the product allowing the visible surface of the heating element to be completely smooth, something that was not possible with rivets. Stress distribution and the thermal expansion and contraction is now even across the entire bonded surface rather than being focus at the point of the individual fixing points. The tape is actually faster to apply than mechanical fixing, a 3 stage process has now become a single stage process, reducing production time and therefore cost.

The adhesive tape used in this case study can be found on our Trade Shop Direct website, it is a Double Sided Polyester Tape.

If you have a specific adhesive tape requirement please give us a call and we will be happy to help, 01353 665141.

Heating Panel using Adhesive Tape

Heating Panel Fully Assembled

How to make outdoor steps safe in wet weather.

safe steps

Did you know falling on slippery steps is the number one cause of accidents and injuries around the home; whilst we know salt is good in the snow and you can add grit to your steps in the winter it can be a messy old business.

To make your stairs and steps safer it’s a good idea to fix abrasive strips to each level. First you will need to make sure the surface is clean and dry, then simply attach a self-adhesive strip near the front of each step.

Our safety tread tape has a finely ground aggregate bonded to the surface to enhance the non slip properties and is available to buy by the roll, which is perfect for ensuring all of your outdoor surfaces are safe.

The textured tape is available in black, yellow & black chevrons and transparent (clear); it can be used inside and outdoors.  Our anti-slip tape is suitable for pretty much any edge that needs to either be clearly visible or anti-slip including ladders, boats and decking areas. The exceptional high bonding properties of the tape makes it suitable for sticking to wood, metal, concrete and tiles.

Ensure your home and workplace is safe this winter and call us on 01353 665141 to place your order or ask for further advice.

Adhesive Tape Application Tips

In order to get the best results form your adhesive tape you need to ensure that you apply it correctly, always follow any manufacturer instructions (if supplied).

Surface Preparation

All surfaces should have no flaky or loose areas and should be completely free from oil, grease, moisture, dust and release agents. Ideally surfaces should be cleaned with a solvent such as Pronatur Orange Solvent. Porous surfaces may need to be sealed prior to application. All surfaces should be dry before application.

Application Temperature

Polly-Tunnel Repair Tape

Polly-Tunnel Repair Tape

When applying adhesive tapes, unless it’s an all-weather adhesive, the substrate (items you are sticking together) temperature should not be less than 15°C. Using adhesive tape in temperatures lower than 15°C can result in hardening of the adhesive and prevent the ultimate bonding strength being reached. Ideal application temperature is between 20 to 40°C. Note that an adhesive tape with the ability to withstand temperatures lower than 15°C does not mean it can be applied in those temperatures.

There are some adhesive tapes that have been designed to be applied in lower temperatures such as our Polly Tunnel Repair Tape.

Pressure Sensitive Adhesive (PSA)

Unless specified, all adhesive tapes use PSA, basically they rely on you applying pressure to them in order to activate the adhesive. Firm pressure and 100% surface contact is key to achieving maximum bond strength. Pressure should be applied evenly and where possible with a roller to ensure there are no air bubbles, important on wide tape.

PSA tapes may take up to a couple of days to reach ultimate adhesion, although this can usually be accelerated by exposing the tape to elevated temperatures for a short period of time.

First Aid Station with Eye Wash and First Aid Kit

It can be difficult to ensure that you provide all the necessary First Aid equipment within a business environment, this is why Trade Shop Direct has launched its First Aid Station.

The First Aid Station consists of a wall mountable information board with First Aid advice, Accident book holder and accident book, eye and wound wash bottles, first aider information and a Workplace first aid kit.

First Aid Station

There are 3 options of first aid kit, a standard (green) kit, a catering (blue) kit with blue bandages and plasters. There is also a burn care first aid kit (red box) which contains burn related first aid equipment.

This First Aid station ensures that the necessary workplace regulations are met, including the Data Protection Act with regards to the Accident Book and personal data storage.

The station can be purchased here.